Interested in Seed Saving? Start Here

Seed saving is a fun hobby which will help you preserve a plant you’ve enjoyed growing (and eating). Tomatoes, beans, pumpkins, peas, you name it – all their seeds can be easily saved for the following year…but only if you start with this:

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Video Transcript for “Interested in Seed Saving? Start Here”

Brian Clapp, WeekendFarmer.com: If you’ve ever considered seed saving, the most important step in the process is what you start with. You need to start with a open-pollinated seeds instead of hybrid seeds. seed saving techniques

Hybrid seeds are those seeds where they take the best attributes of one plant, the best attributes of another plant and cross-pollinate them to create one “perfect” plant. It could be two types of tomato plants, or two types of bean plants etc – they use one that is more disease resistant, one that tastes better – you see the pattern. Propagators will combine these plants through cross-pollination and those plants will create a seed called a hybrid.

The problem with hybrid seeds is that is you try to save those seeds there is no certainty what will grow the next year – it will not grow an exact replica of what you just grew.

Open-pollinated seeds on the other hand are true replications of a single strain of a plant, so if you save those seeds, you will get the exact same plant the next year.

You are probably wondering, how did I know the difference if I want to start seed saving?

Well, there are certain providers that only sell open-pollinated seeds. For example, our friends at SeedsNow.com (see their ad on the right for 10% off) only sell open-pollinated seeds, so if you want to try seed saving, by from them so you can be sure you can save those seeds and have the exact same plant grow the next year.

Summary
Title
Interested in Seed Saving? Start Here
Description

Seed saving is a fun hobby which will help you preserve a plant you've enjoyed growing (and eating). Tomatoes, beans, pumpkins, peas, you name it - all their seeds can be easily saved for the following year...but only if you start this way.

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