Why Are My Vegetables Rotting on the Vine?

When the bottom half of your growing vegetables begin turning brown and appear rotten – you have Blossom End Rot. Tomatoes, squash, watermelon, cucumbers, all can suffer from this infliction, but preventing it is easy as we explain in this short video:

How to Prevent and Cure Blossom End Rot #weekendfarmer #backyardgardening Click To Tweet

Video Transcript for “Why Are My Vegetables Rotting on the Vine?”

Brian Clapp, WeekendFarmer.com:

One of the easiest garden problems to identify is Blossom End Rot. It happens in squashes and cucumbers, most commonly in tomatoes, and just as it sounds, the blossom side of the fruit starts to rot. It appears brown and black and looks unhealthy, the fruit is essentially lost.how to prevent blossom end rot

Now you are probably wondering what causes Blossom End Rot?

Blossom End Rot is caused by a calcium deficiency in the plant, and while we don’t need to get super technical about it, we can fix this problem with relative ease.

The first thing you need to make sure you are doing is watering regularly, deep down to the root level. The reason for this is because even if there is enough calcium present in your soil, your plant needs water to absorb it. So if you are not watering evenly and deep enough, your plant isn’t able to access the calcium in the soil.

If you have started to notice a problem and need a quick fix – you can get a liquid based calcium supplement at your local garden center that you can mix with water and add directly to the base of your plant. That will eradicate the problem moving forward, but won’t help the fruits already afflicted.

What I like to do is start out in a preventative mode, when I plant my tomatoes or squashes, I crush up egg shells, either fresh or one’s that are part of my vermicomposting and have already started to leech out their calcium into the nearby soil. I’ll crush the eggs shells up and put them at the base of the plants as I am transplanting them. This provides a slow-release calcium supply direct to calcium feeding plants where they need it, at the roots.

This allows my plants to have access to calcium throughout the season as it’s flowering and fruiting.

If you take these steps you will never have a problem with Blossom End Rot and you can turn this ugly problem, into an easy solution.

Summary
Title
How to Prevent and Cure Blossom End Rot
Description

When the bottom half of your growing vegetables begin turning brown and appear rotten - you have Blossom End Rot. Tomatoes, squash, watermelon, cucumbers, all can suffer from this infliction, but we know how to prevent and cure Blossom End Rot and we'll share that knowledge

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